Hudson River Community
        Association of Northwest Yonkers, Inc.
                                            Founded 1978F
                                                                                     P.O. Box 866, Yonkers, NY 10702-0866
                                                                            mail@hudsonrivercommunityassociation.org
  •                                                                                    Together we can make a difference!

                          




   




In the 1960's a picture of our waterfront community included neatly kept Victorian homes, Queen Anns, multiple family dwellings, and a variety of businesses.  The streets were safe, the nights were quiet and the environment clean.

TOGETHER WE CAN MAKE IT BETTER!

Residents who chose to stay watched in despair as our once stable neighborhoods were overtaken by urban blight.  We knew that this had been a "great place to live.".


It was not until the Hudson River Museum, in January 1978, mounted an exhibit showcasing the architectural beauty of Warburton Avenue, that a concerted effort was begun to stabilize and revitalize our community.  In May 1978 concerned residents came together and the Hudson River Community Association was formed.  Our goal was set!  The group would fight to improve the area and restore the quality of life that residents had once known.

HRCA has endured 38 years due to the ability and diligence of its leaders and the united goal of its membership.  It is only with the support and continued dedication of our community that HRCA can maintain its strength to meet the challenges that will arise in the future.

Under the very capable leadership of Julia Smith, Dean Grandin, Rick Kern and Diane Pearson, the organization thrived over the years and managed to stem the negative tide which had taken hold.  Today our current President, Barbara P. Smith, with her capable Board, has very effectively carried on this mission of preservation and restoration, along with the new task of seeking responsible development of the Hudson River corridor.

Move to the mid-1970s and a totally different picture emerges.  You would see many neglected homes, burned-out buildings and closed businesses.  Drug dealing, crime, noise and an environment strewn with graffiti, garbage and abandoned cars would complete the picture